David S. Broder

Tue, 08/06/2013 - 13:49 -- m029k161@ku.edu
Award Year: 
1997
Recipient Name: 
David S. Broder
Brief Summary: 
David Broder, the 1997 winner of the William Allen White medal, graduated with honors from the University of Chicago with a bachelor's degree in liberal arts in 1947. He earned his master's degree in political science from the University of Chicago in 1951.
Web Biography: 

By Jesscia Tims, class of 2003

David Broder, the 1997 winner of the William Allen White medal, graduated with honors from the University of Chicago with a bachelor's degree in liberal arts in 1947. He earned his master's degree in political science from the University of Chicago in 1951.

He began his career in journalism in 1953 as a reporter for The Daily Pantagraph in Bloomington, Ill. as a reporter. He began covering national politics for Congressional Quarterly in 1955. From 1965 to 1966, he wrote about national politics for the New York Times.

In 1966, Broder joined The Washington Post as a senior national correspondent and columnist. He was named an associate editor of The Post in 1975.

In 1972, an American University survey of 100 political journalist named him "American's most respected political reporter." Broder won the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary in 1973.

Broder has covered every national and major state political campaign and convention since 1960.

He has published six books including: "Changing of the Guard: Power and Leadership in America" and "The Party's over: The Failure of politics in America." Broder also co-wrote "The Republican Establishment: The Present and Future of the G.O.P."

Broder's Washington Post columns are published every Wednesday and Sunday. His column is syndicated by the Washington Post Writers Group in over 260 newspapers across the country.

 

 

 

"The enduring ideology of the American press is probably progressivism the mindset and belief system of William Allen White, among many other, and that is the urge to cleanse the government of the vestiges of crass politics an particularly of money influence." — David S. Broder, William Allen White Award acceptance speech, February 2, 1997

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