Plagiarism and Fabrication Policies

 

POLICY ON PLAGIARISM AND FABRICATION/FALSIFICATION

The William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications does not tolerate plagiarism, fabrication of evidence and falsification of evidence.

Penalties for plagiarism, fabrication or falsification can include a failing grade for the course and expulsion from the School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

If you have any questions about what constitutes plagiarism, fabrication or falsification, please consult the professor of the course.

The following definitions are from Article II, Section 6, of the University Senate Rules and Regulations, revised FY98.

Plagiarism

Knowingly presenting the work of another as one's own (i.e., without proper acknowledgement of the source). The sole exception to the requirement of acknowledging sources is when the information or ideas are common knowledge.

Fabrication and Falsification

Unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.


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Best ad staff in the nation: 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012. —College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers
85 percent of classes have fewer than 50 students
2nd place: Hearst Foundation “College Pulitzers” national writing contest, 2011
Top-ranked teachers, including National Journalism Teacher of the Year Doug Ward
71 percent of classes have 30 or fewer students
Students prepare marketing projects for Sprint, Coca-Cola, NASA, and other corporations
81 percent of 2011 journalism graduates were employed full time six months after graduating
—University of Georgia study